Skip to main content

Full text of "Wayside Inn front door diaries"

See other formats


<zscMgy ^^>%4^^^Mh*uAskc^c/. 



s 







Jh&+JL- 








— pS^e. 



t^K^iJl 









&-v-e/is 



^yt^Le^* 



^A^lJL- ^^Jty ^^^^^ 







CUT<^>ycy 



^^^vtJC/ ^yAj<i^ 







O^c/L _^}^Le--^L^x^ 







^_^y£^U(r-z^^x^J^L<r 



^M^2-*-^Ll1L^j/', 



(^y^Jly <& /J 33. ^H^c^j. 














-L^pLs 



CL^ 



/ \Jjl<Zj<2^<J<sC . 



DANCE OF '60S RETURN TO 
CHASE HARD TIMES AWAY 

McKENZIE, Tenn (A. P.)-The new 
South has revived the songs of the old 
to sing and dance hard times away. 

Reminiscent of the Dixie of corn 
shucklings, molasses makings, log rol- 
lings and pit barbecues, the old-fash- 
ioned square dance has achieved new 
popularity. 

Folks laughed when the American 
legion post first suggested square- 
dances, and they're still laughing, only 
now it is with merriment as the gay 
modern girl dances to the tunes that 
made her grandmother gay years ago. 

"Up the river and around the bend. 
Eight hands up and gone again." 

It is the command of the caller. He I 
will follow it with: 

"Lady around the lady, do, so, do. I 
Lady around the gents and the gents 
don't go. Balance all." 

Square dances sponsored by the 
Legion are held every Thursday nighti 
And folks are coming from miles 
around for such well-remembered 
as the "Ocean Wave," "Figure Eight'' 
and "Bird in the Cage." 







*q-<xJC jZL^JI ^A^^ 



























y&>^ S?-<z-~Jh^' c^c^c^ ^--^c^y 



^ ^r^A^Y^^ r! 



OL/l 









riX 









.^fa^C*-^ _yCJcAz^ r ^uJL^o^<^ _Ja^^- 














JL 



i^tce. 









<yUaA^O:#^ 








( 



I 





C£J&Cc£' /#, '733 




An old hand loom, found in the 
attic where it had lain dr.st-covered 
for many years, is providing a means i 
oi livelihood for the N. L.. IjJarringer 
family at Eugene, Or. With odds I 
and ends of rags they make rag rugs j 
end trade them for necessities. One 
rug recently brought SO pounds of 
cabbage and 60 pounds of carrots. 











a^ 











^Aa^lXJL^ 




JU-X 













2^ $£A^<3/U?-<J-^^^ 




( 



L 



L 




^ 





oj 



out- ^tA^ ^^u^cAy 




eige^< <^c*S 



^u^cy 






<e^ y 









ccfc 



~c<ue^<i/ 



S^^Pt^H^ 



£t^st^t^C/- 



^ 










*3& 




-iAs^k. 















^j^JU, ^>ȣ^i~ J O^aA^uoJC/ 




'■fi/LULuj,' " CCIa^ /& /J33. ~-^^L^>-. 













- 




^£-JC» cut _JsyijL^ v 



_Ms-t 







Cr/tV 






OUtA^ 



&A 



<ASIjL/ 



oJC 










JtAc 







H, '7 J3 




SUDBURY ON RAMPAGE 



Overflows Hundreds of Acres in 
Wayland and Sudbury 

The Sudbury River had spread to 
thrice its normal width in some pi. 
yesterday, inundating hundreds of 
acres of farm land and covering sec- 
tions of roads in Wayland and Sud- i 
bury with from two to four feet of j 
water. 

Cellars were flooded in most homes | 
situated on low land in this vicinity. j 

The overflow of the Sudbury River, | 
which has been extending its area for 
the past three days, washed over con- 
siderable parts of the Old Cochituate, 
Old Sudbury, Concord and Pelham Isl- 
and roads in Wayland. The last named 
was practically impassable. On the 
others many automobiles became stalled 
after passing through the miniature 
lakes. 

The River road near the Wayland Golf 
Club was only marked by a lane of 
trees on either side. Water was over 
five feet deep in some parts. 

The poles and wires on the southern 
division of the Boston and Maine rail- 
road were down for about 500 feet near 
the Wayland railroad crossing on the 
Boston Post road. The lapping of the 
flood waters was gradually undermining 
the roadbed, railroad officials said. 

In Sudbury the Hop Brook, winding 
around the Wayside Inn, had formed a 
small pond in the rear of the historic 
structure. There was no immediate 
danger of water damage to the inn, 
authorities at Henry Ford's school 
stated yesterday. 



l/ 







<^y /K /?te.^&L*<-s 




^J&o^yL^ 














= 



t 



: 










w^£«y^£c*<t^ 




f- 



jZty^isJf ^w^ J^^^cJ/ 




Keener of the Bar 




<£\3„ /J33. 







"ATINE host, arrayed in the authen- 
tic costume of the old tavern 
keeper, short apron, breeches, buckle 
shoes, wig, and flowing tie, stands 
before the bar of the tap-room in the 
famous Old Ordinary at Hingham, 
Mass. This old tavern, once a famed 
stage stop, is now the property of 
the Hingham Historical Society and 
is kept open to the public through- 
out the year. Behind the bar 
be seen the containers of departed 
spirits. 




it 



^i^c^L^S^e^L^ 



_JlyLAJl^l^Lyy / L- 




yU^C^LL 








~>e^ 



V. 



jtLc^^yC^ 







" 



c 






-■^%s<X^l^duL/ v^^c^i^ 




%^i*JI*lc4,-, C{JqsU(J^ &<^ /73377^b*^xz^fc. 







"AS ANCIENT IS THIS HOSTCXRY 
S> ANY IN THE LAND MAY BE. 
BUILT IN THE OLD COLONIAL DAY. 
WHEN MEN LIVED IN A GRANDER WAY 
WITH AMPLER HOSPITALITY— " 

— LONCTOXOW 







V^-"/ 



,^i^t^y 




















: 



«* 



■ 




^#Lu^i 



J^jJLjJeJ- 





jfe~"„. 




z 





<f-r(J 






J%L & 



<Z/- 











G 



€ 




/cJUy 





i^aJc/ 



O/, 



; (^jJoAsdl/ &l /J33. ~^_Jj^c<L#^t. 



6LAAy^yi^<^y<^<^i2y 






^J^ULfJLy 






GL^y 
















J&Loa/ / 















WAYSIDE INN 



SO. SUDBURY, MASS. 



TEL. SUDBURY 180 




<^fi^ oJU^ <Us'UL ^L^ 'yUL, 







cXeA^ 























^j^XzJ^At^cy ^c^w c^/ 




c 



c 






5 



K^^L^CxJl- 6ULJ- , 






^yLl^Jt'' So, l?£3. r/^L&*^4<^v 

















jOtc 



ymJCa/ 






c 





4 /^j: -/S^^^->^ 




May 

When tae breeze is mild and fragrant — that is 

May — 
And the birds from southern climes are here to 
stay — 
And the magic of the weather • 
Makes the dogs feel in fine feather 
So they scratch our lawns together — 
That is May! 

When the buds begin to blossom — that is May — 
And the grass is growing greener every day — 
When the lovely birds are mating 
And the cats with watchful waiting 
Covert chances are debating — 
That is May! 

When our joints are getting limber — that is 

May — 
And we seem a trifle frisky, let us say — 
When we feel we might take chances 
And engage in May-pole dances 
We're so filled with sweet romances — 
That is May! 

PAULA STUYVESANT. 






O^ 




^>C 



t Jl^Cy<LilJ^JjL^<X^ 






a 



J^^Q^aJL. \J^A. \lp^AA^tal/ 



/^JXJL-4L 




k ^Lu^o^ /f33. -^^L^t4!uCt. 





p<jjb ^^ DhxA^- Gsi&tJh^c^ 



CLkLc^j^ ^U^ULy ^#<JlJL-JL 














^Lu4/ 









JUJuc^^Uu rif M:. 3t^. y%u {MJ > 










^ i / . AJL 4C-d<£_ stmts' 





-^l* 



VlL< 



--JS7A 








^■i 




/L 



c / Q^L^-L/ 






aZ: 



JL 



-L/L-J<lc>Cxi-^ 




^ /J33. 



'jl 






JlJL<LA^h, 




^¥6Uf 



■K&42,- 




AyKlJL .i^le^ ^fc^ r^AjJU&LJ. Ax^eJz. 

Jcfii 2ET1 ^ ; 




-w(- 




( 


















? e^ 











<t/c-<+-cJLs. 




'I^L-o- 



-a^f, 



lJcjl,' 





h aJty 



<"'" ,y 





7, /fBA. 





















^T /%.3.3. -/>fcci^. 




4<JL ^&- 















Ct9-yU2^ 



7, //^ 





cut- J^AjL v=3^c^O 

f J&AjjLi^LJ~-iA 7 *L/ ^-J^Zyt^ ^X^^jZ^-J. (y&dC<2*AJL 
^V^uSL _jX^U.y j^o^zU^ y^fOL^cl -jUs'L.iL^t 



- 






c 




4CM 




JU, 




Z- ^c-^O' 




cjy. 



^0^J2^vi^^^L^^ ^/l^f, /£ /^Sd -^A^UHy 



















j&Le_ %^0-c^A. 



i* 



Jy^f^oi. iz tJks % J 2 



■ //, ty9L& 




<?^£LA /( 



J. 




KJ.< 






opt:). 



1/ 



<^-\U^' 



K. 









—A 



<-<L 





\2^ 




( 



t 



lfc~UA^i^UC . 




O-tt-J? i 







^l^tstJL yC^ _^>&£jl- .yQ^OL 



74^ 














1*<J 



\J <^<^c l^ 







^KjO^ /*fc /f33. C^A^tX^a^z^' 





^Xci^cc^/ OLfiA-Jt- 









<z^^>l J^< 





-oycJL 



!- — Si ^LCst-^L/L-dbs ^^^Pt^yi^ A&^uUr£ uJl/. 




/ 






/«£ '? 33 



/ \yijL- aLA2^CL^iAjC. 



Wayland and Sudbury Gardens Open 

ON FRIDAY, MAY 19, THE ROAD to Wayland and Sud- 
bury will be much traveled, several beautiful and original gar- 
dens the objective. Mrs. Robert Ames of Wayland has con- 
sented to show her spring garden where tulips, daffodils and 
narcissi enliven the landscape. 

The feature of Mrs. Amos Hadley's place is a serpentine 
wall inspired by the famous masonry at Thomas Jefferson's 
Virginian paradise, Monticello. 

While motoring through Wayland village, motorists are 
invited to stop for a glimpse of Mrs. Martin Edward's Colonial 
gardens. From there they will continue for tea on to Mrs. J. 
Sydney Stone's cool lawn. Mrs. Stone, a committee member, 
has asked another ardent supporter of the M. S. P. C. C, Mr3. 
Joseph S. Seabury, to preside at the tea urn. Martha Seabury, 
Dorothy Stone, Anne Torbert, Louise Howe and Hope Hubbard 
make up a quintette of debutante waitresses. 

In Sudbury, the "Elizabeth of Hungary Chapel" on the 
Ralph Adams Cram estate will be a Mecca for everyone. The 
chapel doors are delightfully encrusted with wrought iron roses, 
the symbol of that picturesque and royal saint. Within, an 
altar with rich hangings give that little building an old world 
atmosphere. 

The popularity of rock gardens make that of the Fred 
Whitings in Sudbury of double interest. All sorts of odd 
plants grow over and beside the rocks in informal patterns. 
Mrs. Richard Hobart will be in Sudbury that afternoon to take 
charge of ■the gates and direct motorists. 





''L^-^cMfT' 






<^UJ-L^ 










i j tc c £z vote ^~*-jL Z£jLi«-*uJ^ a^JL ^ 




4to 








/CJl,&Sl ^JL^^s ^c^ejL^vty o-uX ayf ^xj-c^^Jh - 
O-A^JjiAy ^^Ju^y' j<L^~t^o^- /yCc^cj^., 





^±d^<^iyu^ 




'ZtZs. 




























dCjKt-£*^r> 



d> 




. *J SI' f 



•> 



watUi. 









-J—CA--, 



£/yi/^Udy U 



cjbbs 



< 











'MASSACRE' PICTURE CALLED 
NOT REVERE'S CONCEPTION 

That the familiar Paul Revere pic- 
ture of the Boston Massacre in State 
st, March 5, 1770, did not originate 
with Revere, but was actually an en- 
graving by him based on an earlier 
drawing by Henry Pelham, Boston en- 
graver, related by marriage to John 
Copley, the painter, was charged in 
a letter from Pelham to Revere. 

An alleged copy of the letter was 
read yesterday afternoon by George 
Francis Dow, director of the museum 
of the Society for the Preservation of 
New England Antiquities, in the course 
of an address entitled: "Art and 
Crafts in 18th Century New England," 
delivered by him at the last meeting 
of the season of the Bostonian Society 
in the Old State House. 

"Two examples of the original Pel- 
ham picture of the massacre are 
known to be still in existence, one in 
private hands in Virginia," Mr Dow 
declared. 

The revelation was made in con- 
nection with consideration of the work 
of the earliest known painters and 
engravers in New England. 




^lA^f-f^C^ 








aA/~ 







^^ _ _ 






\ 



^k^u.^JoL *2bi 





nJJlvUu^ , ^Uuj & c[ /jterlC£«*-«^£. 









^vi/iA^yrV' - 














yyVCAZ-- 




f^m 







cu 



, dUC 










J 



















V 







j * 










< 




Five Rush Light Holders — The Three With Wood Block Bases Are Early 
New England and Have Candle Holders Also. The Plain Holder in '5ront 
(Right) Is English— At Left (Front) a Very Finely Wrotw 1 ** .d Much 
Ornamented Tapir Holder of Steel. Perhaps Made by a C Armorer 

Several Centuries Ago. (Writer's Collection) 



The Rushlight, 
Poor Relation 
of the Candle 

From the Reeds of Our 

Swamps Came New England's 

First Home Illuminating 

By Arthur H. Hayward 

ON Saturday, January 7, the Edi- 
tor of the Transcript Antiquea 
page printed the following- query, 
which he had received through 
the mail, from a Boston lady: 

From what does the name of the 
Rushlight Club spring? What are 
rushlights and are they sold at an- 
tique shops? 

The editor replied briefly, explaining 
these interesting and curious "poor rela- 
tions" of the more aristocratic candle. It 
occurred to me that there might be other 
readers of this column who are also un- 
familiar with these relics of former days 
and who would like to see pictures of_ 
them and learn something of their history 
and uses. 

Rushlights, or more properly speaking, 
rushlight holders, are among the rarer 
forms of lighting devices, and as they 
were in use in this country only to a very 
limited extent in the earlier colonial 
years, the few that survived are now 
rarely found in the antique shops. Rush- 
lights, or the poor man's candles, were 
in common use in Europe for many 
years. The Pilgrims and other early 
settlers in this country were doubtless 
familiar with them and they were in use 
here to a limited extent; but as oil from 
fish and whales could be readily obtained, 
the use of primitive lamps burning these 
fluids was found much better, and the 
light they furnished (though we should 
consider it dim and poor enough) was 
stronger than the rushlights, so that their 
use, at least in New England, was soon 
superseded by the "betty" and similar 
lamps, and these in turn were later sup- 
plemented by real candles. 

Cat-o'-Nine Tails and Reeds 

The rushlight was made by taking tall 
rushes (cat-o'-nine tails) or similar reeds, 
that are found growing in swampy places 
along our shores, and carefully stripping 
the outside bark, leaving the soft, porous, 
inner portion or pith of the stem, which 
was then dried in the sun and formed the 
wick of the rushlight. A shallow pan 
or receptacle was filled with melted ani- 
mal fats or grease of various kinds, and 
the dried' reeds pulled through it. Suc- 
cessive dippings added further layers of 
fat, which when cooled, formed a slender, 



flexible candle, often three or more feet 
long. When ready to be used, one end 
was inserted between the iron jaws of 
a holder, the rest was then loosely coiled 
about the stem or base of the holder and 
pulled up as fast as consumed. While 
these would burn more rapidly than a 
regular tallow candle, a well made rush- 
light is said to be capable of burning 
for an hour or longer, and as their use 
was mainly for short periods, they an- 
swered the purpose fairly well. 

Rev. Gilbert White, in his "Natural 
History of Selborne" published more than 
a century and a half ago, has this to say 
of the making of rushlights, as he had ob- 
served it in his parish: 

"The proper species of rush for this 
purpose seems to be the common soft 
rush (juncus effusus) found in most moist 
pastures, by the side of streams, etc. 
These rushes are in best condition in the 
height of summer, but may be gathered 
quite on to autumn. As soon as cut they 
must 'be flung into water and kept there, 
for otherwise they will dry and shrink 
and the peel will not run. It is no easy 
matter to divest a rush of its peel or 
rind, so as to leave one regular narrow, 
even rib from top to bottom that may 
support the pith. When these 'junci' are 
thus far prepared, t Kp y must lie out on 
the grass to be bleached, and take the 
6>— for some nights, and. afterwards be 
dried in the sun. 

"Some address is required in dipping 
these rushes in scalding fat or grease, 
but this k^iack also is to be attained In 
practice. The careful, wife obtains all 
fater fat for nothing, for she saves the 
"scummings of her bacon. pot for this use, 
and if the grease abounds with salt, she 
causes the salt to precipitate to the bot- 
tom by setting the scummings in a warm 
oven . About six pounds of grease will 
dip a pound of rushes. If men that keep 
bees will mix a little wax with the grease, 
it will give it a consistency and render it 
more cleanly, and make the rushes burn 
longer; mutton suet would have the same 
effect, 

"A good rush which measured in 
length two feet and four and one-half 
inches, being mounted, burnt only three 
minutes short of an hour. These rushes 
give a good, clear light. An experienced 
old housekeeper assures me that one 
pound and a half of rushes (that is, the 
dried rush before dipping) completely sup- 
plies his family the year round, since 
working people burn no candles in the 
long days because they rise and go to 
bed by daylight." 

Discarded Early — Rare Now 

It was some years before they com- 
menced importing sheep from Europe and 
England, with other much needed sup- 
plies for the Colonies. As the flocks in- 
creased, candle-making became a common 
and much practised art, and rushlights 
were then generally discarded- Many of 
the iron holders (several of which are 
illustrated on this page) had also a place 
for candles, making them useful for 
many more years. This accounts for their 
rarity at the present time, and when oc- 
sionally one turns up in an antique shop, 
the chances are (particularly if it is of 
American make) it will be tagged with a 
fairly stiff price. 



I The Industrial School 
for Crippled and Deformed 
jren 

241 St. BotoljiluStreet, Boston 

The First 4>f Its Kind 

Established in America 

CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Instructed in Grammar and High School Subjects with Industrial Work 
to enable them to become self-supporting. 

Typical courses: Printing. Linotype Operating, Typewriting, Office 
Practice, Stenography, Woodworking. Cabinet Making. Sewing, Linen 

Embroidery. Bookbinding, Cooking, Cobbling, Cane Seating. 
Physical ailments oi pupils under supervision of Medical Staff and 

Transportation and midday meal furnished by the School 

Gifts for the Maintenance of the School, Earnestly Asked For, 

May Be Sent to the Treasurer 

President, Charles H. Taylor; Vice Presidents, William Endlcott, 
Samuel Hooper Hooper, Augustus Thorndike, Jr., M.D.; Secretory. 
Thomas K. Cummins; Trustees, Charles E. Cotting, Thomas K. Cummins. 
John E. Fish. M.D.. Augustus Hemenway. Jr., Joseph Grafton Minot, 
Charles H. Taylor, Augustus Thorndike. M.D. 

Treasurer, Charles E. Cotting, 50 Fedoral St. Boston 

SI.- n 8 



Organized 1891 Incorporated 1891, 

TI3* Boston Floating Hospital 

. ^nit of the ISetv England Medical Center 

JACKSON MEMORIAL BUILDING 
20 Ash Street, Boston 

A free hospital for the treatment of babies' and 
children's diseases. Patients admitted to 12 years. 

Contributions and bequests are earnestly solicited. 

For information address 
HENRY B. SAWYER, Chairman RALPH L0WEL.L, Treasurer 

20 Ash Street 70 Federal Street 



jy 18 



Free Hospital for Women 

365 Pond Avenue, Brooktine, Mass. 

This institution treats, entirely without charge, poor women 
who are afflicted with diseases peculiar to their sex. 

BOABD OF TRUSTEES 

President, GEORGE R. FEARING 

Vice Preside*' I , WI LLI AM A MORY 

Treasurer, RICHARD C. PAINE 



JOSEPH T WALKER, Jr. 



REGINALD W. BIRD 
SYDNEY S. CONRAD 
FREDERICK S. CONVERSE 
RI( HARD E. DANIELSON 
ROGER ERNST 
FRANCIS WRIGHT FABYAN 



Asst. Treasurer, CURTIS CHIPMAN 
17 Court Street, Boston 



THE HOME FOR AGED WOMEN 

205 South Huntington Avenue, Boston 

Incorporated April 30, 1849 

Fully supports about 150 aged women and helps 

about 120 others in their homes 

BOARD OF MANAGERS 

SAM1 ISL D. PARKER, President 

FRANK w. K.\ \x. Treasurer, 50 State st Boston 
FREDERIC A, TURNER, Secretary 
W. T. Councilman Mrs. C, Cunningham G. Glover Crocker 

Clifford Uiirrham Miss Lelinda I. Uewson Rt. Rev. Henry K Sherrill 

Edw. W. Hutcblns Vilas [Catherine T. Bro.iks |.,„ Z n.,l„ „„,,. 

( Jerl rude Baker Mrs Chas. M. Baker 

l ' .M ) rumfoam Mrs. R ■'■■' < < . i >odge 

Ellen Graves Mil ■ Lydla \; ans 

Mildred T. HaaMncs Miss Eliz. Townsend 



nk B. Be mis 





^/^l^c^, X^cy *M /J33. -^Jb^*-^'. 















'Z'?& 















a 3, /J 33. 



/ j^X^-^ic^a^ct>i<A . 















£^Cc- 





'j2^JLyuL^JU^u, f X/^ey frfc /J33. ^J^L^rJ. 











_/i/-0~QL4dc. 



l^cu^ &J& ^£J(jL \~^Lt<^rC j^Ctvuiy a^>&s^. 












OytJ 



Ch 






'U^UsZ^ 



6U 



^J^yi^ - 



■ UlX^ 














tA&Kl^ 






V*-~> 






4f yJ&- 



c 




"^-^oyyL- 











f /I 










y &l /p3. -ff^W. 













-STL 




e 




r 












V 




^w&U'is 




£?, /yss.~~i^t.cuux^y. 








3o, //». <3^*^ 












>»^T^£^X^^<^^, 




O^UA.'K-a~K/ / . 



3/, /J 33. 

















JW 1 * 







c 



^^/1/sJL^MLscJt*^' ^^jA^yty Jjg^OtA^^aX/ 





-^2Le 






CLCLxUL, 



sUS-ZC&y. _^U^(^i 






_yii^LG^' 



jy-HjL 



<C 






Z^(h^cyk 






-L<yi 



(yUjC 



C?^iC^ 






JUL. .Jur' ^dy ^A^O^u^y Jhusuffc't 



a~ 



j£^ alt. 







yiJ jrt^^al£< tJ*-rt_A 
















(Ay _^^u^.ot^y 



^^>Zy6^^^ ^WcX 



( 












IS 



A/ 








d^H^yt^L C^uy^ 







^JX^lS^UyL - / UL#JZ 











; Qm^vl^ 3, /fS3. 











/ J 



L^^oCc^yL^ 



'/ 




>cc/./ 



Nfc Jvt^rO aJ^c *~yvzj^ . 



^l/yUXj^-J^UU- ; 




(*, /-/J3. 















7 r ^ /? 




vt£. ^u^J^C^ cut- 








/x. . 



^y^yu^Jt-dUA, - , 




7, /f3d. &^'>m&JL ,%££. 






yyyc-. 



60V^A 






L^-yt 



aCl 






06-UL 



7, 



6 



Ca^yL < 



QUJL4AxL„ ^n/L^jtZ yCo 




CL 



&-/ 



HJL 



^1/1/L* 



cX 



CUy 



tJ-it-C £ / ■< 



6L> 



lea LALA/ v 



JU K 












1/ 







^04. yQLc y 



fUsi 
















s-cUu. 



^C^^A £L 



lsL^n/ 





Stone Walls of New England 
Epitomize History of People 
And Record Their Character 



Your New England Caravan 

First o> 12 Articles 



By HENRY EDISON WILLIAMS 
Staff Writer of The Christian Science Monitor 



The rugged stone walls of old New 
England! An epic of a nation is 
written in their lichen-freckled 
lines. 

Stone on stone they stand as sym- 
bols of America's onward march; 
mementos of America's achieve- 
ments; running stories from Amer- 
ica's book of history. Field-stone 
fences, stretching back 30^ years to 
the modest dawn of a proud nation. 

They speak of the back-testing 
labor of colonist and pioneer who, 
after hewing a way through great 
stands of pine and hardwoods to 
some sequestered holding, bent 
heavy sinewed shoulders to the 
work of clearing the land of rocky 
debris left by long-vanished ice 
fields. They record the planting of 
modest crops, the reaping, the 
plowing, the appearance of fresh 
crops of stones to be deposited on 
growing boundary walls. 

And as the field grew, so grew 
the stone walls of New England- 
year after year, generation on gen- 
eration. After a time came the 
stone boat — rough planked skids on 
which the impedimenta of other- 
wise fertile acres were rolled, to be 
dragged to growing wall by heavy- 
fet-locked draught horses or strain- 
ing oxen. After a time came the 
doughty tractor to make play of the 
lesson of labor set by the callous- 
handed and stern-hearter 5 founders 
of American democracy. 

Vary With the Terrain 
The physical appearance of these 
stone walls varies. One comes upon 
them in central Massachusetts high- 
lands wide enough to form a Roman 
causeway— two parallel lines of 
heavy rounded boulders, roughly laid 
one atop the other to a height of 
two or three feet, the space between 



being filled with smaller rocks 
tossed in from the adjacent fields. 









'cu 



J^y^L^J&f 



^c 




^t^y 




X 




(. Io^uA^pC 



a£ 



' }ta-^JL^cf< f f-<U&UL /£s /'f33. / JuUx^La^C. 

















^<2^^L^e^>Z^/ 



a 




L. 



7 ^sQ>OL \SU*c^c- 










0~y0_^ 









' 




I^IjL^cIL-clUs , J^L^OLy / 3, /J33. \J^-^ J^c^. 




^ 



k 




/ — ^ 










(u^Z, 




^fyCauj/^cJU, S^U^ 'Ja-aUtsytaJP. 



/ 







; yu*cu '(), /J33. 




^-CA 



M 



Ve^L^ 




'JjfcLMtJlMeJLs CUtj( 



M^u^JtJk 




id 

fS2r 








^ 



( 




jl.SL 




t^ocdc/: 








A 




-f^LUvC 








_yi^-t^CfcL 




rfU/ k 




sli"cuss 

OflY 111 TUFTS 



Senior Class Day at Tufts Col- 
lege today is one of the most im- 
pressive days of the commencement 
season. Dr. Lee S. McCollester's 
address to the seniors as they at- 
tend their last college chapel serv- 
ice invariably gives the graduating 
students a sad thrill. 

The various class histories, songs, 
poems, and speakers officiate dur- 
ing this ceremony, and Felix An- 
druszkawiecz, of Haverhill, class 
marshal, awards the presentations, 
always of facetious nature, to t"he 
three under classes. 

These exercises are followed by 
a, baseball game between Tufts and 
Boston College, an annual event 
which has become traditional for 
senior day at Tufts. 

During the evening a concert by 
the Salem Cadet Band on the 
campus, and dancing in Goddard 
Gym and on the tennis courts, 
serve to amuse the thousands of 
gu*stsjj^^_^y w 



3 















<*-/ 





tL 






*X*2/ ^XL^^tJLsdL 








lT-rfl*tCLA^f~y<^ 




f ^*U,i 









^^VL^-&-iyU 
















tCvCJL 



t£->L~~ 
















^•IK 



ojL 



Ul^lL &o, /<?33. ^ J^clxiu^C. 



^UM4/ 










JU^ - 

-~^l£4j$LJl ^TLJuuJsL/ ^>suc/L*-**~-t- - 

£^ A ^ C ^ _^^^ S^tyUfls^ 










FAMOUS '83 QUARTET 
SINGS ITS OLD SONGS 

Feature of the 50-Year 
Reunion of Harvard Class 



SUDBURY, June 20— The old class 
quartet that used to "steal the show" 
back in '80 when the members of the 
Harvard '83 class got together at 
freshman socials, rolled back the years 
at the 50th reunion of the class at 
Wayside Inn today and once again 
won the honors of the occasion. 

Perhaps their voices were not as 
strong today and maybe memory failed 
one or another at different parts of 
the old songs, but to their classmates 
they were the same old singers, just 
as good today as they were a half- 
century ago. 

The members of this famous Si 
quartet-such a quartet perhaps as no 
other Harvard class or any other col- 
lege class could offer intact after 
53 years-are Dr Fercival J. Eaton, 
Provincetown; Dr Howard Lilienthal, 
New York city; Dr Sumner Coolidge, 
Middleboro, and J. A. Machado, Ot- 
tawa. 

Hardly had the 79 members and 
wives and their daughters assembled 
at the historic inn today when the 
q-jartet was called upon for the songs 
that have featured every reunion of 
the class. They sang several times to 
the great enjoyment of the gathering 
and th* enthusiasm with which they 
entered into e songfest and the re- 
sponse of the gathering belied the fret 
that all of the members are over 70- 
years of age. 

The quartet was organized in tne 
freshman year and whenever time and 
opportunity have permitted them to 
meet in the 50 years that have elapsed 
since their Commencement exercises 
they have joined in the harmony that 
made them so popular as undergradu- 

Th'e reunion of the class-50 years 
out this month and therefore chief 
guests at Harvard's Commencement- 
was delightfully informal. After greet- 
ings and welcomes at the inn, all sat 
down to luncheon. There was no 
spepchmaking, it was a family reunion. 

After enjoying the luncheon and 
singing at the inn and walks about 
the grounds, lasting several hours, the 
entire party motored to the beautiful 
home of a classmate, Sumner B. Pear- 
main and Mrs Pearmain, who live on 
top of Nobscot Hill in Framingham. 
Mr and Mrs Pearmain entertained the 
gathering at tea late in the afternoon 
and, after a little social, the party 
adjourned for the day. 

Tomorrow the festivities will con- 
tinue The women will lunch at the 
Faculty Club, Quincy st, Cambridge, 
and the members of the class will have 
their lunch at Dillon Field House, Sol- 
dier.- Field. They will all meet at the 
ball game afterward and at night the 
class will have its annual dinner at 
the Faculty Club. More members are 
expected to arrive in time for the din- 
ner and the attendance is expected 
to be exceptionally large for a 50- 
year class. _ 

The class will attend the Commence- 
ment exercises Thursday. 








.<^c 




%2_A-Jb 





^nsisVU // 0<-Hy~l^yL 



al 




, f L*&uu £3, /p3. 






l^LOAUSL^t. 









V^^ <£fe/p3. 





<-<£ L^ 




V ^OiM^/. 



^^J^^^yQ^cJU^ ^2»<^s 






tAsyi-JLcutds, ^ptt^ULs &5, /J '33 
















I 



^ 








6LsiS~JL ^Ct-6^> C^LUJUc 




Oc'U. 





lJl^ vt^z^-*^ /(^^tyt-^LcJL- 








4^ A^U2^lX^ 



^U^rXAt 





(led 






■a/x 



^UlJ^ 



y CL 



^iMy 



rULs 






/VVL 





U^t^Ci 



^Ak^risCC 










u^Jtl^ 



CL/ 




rj? 











1@s JL^uzJL- ^/j^lA, Chx^ 

















^/^yiM-s 







^dCu^i 







jL^JL^vtJL<4^c}L 








£7, /p3. 




f sQj&s 


































- 



— „ 



. » 




Aye^^ 



'^cCU**' 4o t /<?33. 






G^££tsyl 



A, 




^AA<AL^C4~iAA 
















_U*Szl^ 



^UyC^CfieA^ 



^Xl<L0^ 



cj&jls 



"